A detail of Rittstieg’s theory

Today I want to discuss with you one little detail of Rittstieg’s theory. It’s really a little detail, but as I see it, his whole theory and his main presumption stands and falls with that. It’s the alleged city arms of Atlan, which Rittstieg learned from 3 Maya-priests in El Salvador, according to his report.

The symbol can be seen on a German subsite of his homepage and looks like this:

The alleged city arms of Atlan/Tula

He is sure, that he found it on page 52 of the Codex Dresdensis. It’s the only connection between his theory of Atlan and the Codex Dresdensis. Where should it be there?

The Glyph that Rittstieg identified as the city arms of Atlantis

Here is the same glyph, three times. So actually a glyph like the one that Rittstieg describes, exists on the page. Shocking? Let me show you the glyph in context on the page.

Look at the second row of the 3x5 segment an the bottom

These dots and lines above the symbols are how Maya wrote their numbers. You have to read the whole thing in columns, from top to down. I talked to two experts on the Maya calendars, Mario and Jens of http://www.faszination-maya.de/, a very informative and outstanding blog on everything Maya (on German). Let me explain with them, what this segment shows.

It is actually a day glyph. “1 Ak’bal” to be exact. One of 260 different possibilities. (You remember, that the Tzolkin calendar of the Maya has 260 days? That’s one of them.) In order, the days read:
12 Lamat, 1 Ak’bal, 3 Etz’nab, 5 Been, 7 Lamat.
The distance between all those days is 15 days every time. The function of it is that those 15 days are the smallest difference between a solar and a lunar sclipse in this case. But is there a hint for the treasure?

Well, not exactly here, according to Rittstieg, but remember that he said, that he read the date of the destruction of Atlan from this page. So the glyph has to be somewhere again on this page. Now have a look at the whole page and look for the glyph.

Funny game: Spot the glyph!

If you couldn’t find it, let me help you. Look totally to the right, there are two columns of dots and lines painted in red and black. The bottom of these columns is made of two day glyphs. And they are:
- left: 3 Etz’nab, 7 Lamat
- right: 12 Lamat, 1 Akbal
If those days sound familiar then you read carefully. Those are the exact same days from the left. Here the day glyphs are given a special date from the long count calendar. The glyph 1 Akbal is the one Rittstieg was looking for.

Now imagine what Rittstieg thought. He found the city arms of Atantis with a date next to it. And which is this date? Sure it must be October 30th 666 BC, cause this is what Rittstieg says.

Close… the dates are actually November 12th 755 and November 27th 755. AD! Almost exactly 1421 years after the date that Rittstieg read there.

I can’t follow his calculations anymore. And I think nobody can, because he claims to have found out the real dates of the Maya calendars, but doesn’t show how, at least not publicly. He just says, that the connection between Maya calendar and Gregorian calendar is wrong, as the scholars calculated it.

What I wanted to show was, that the glyph Rittstieg looked for is in fact a normal glyph. An ordinary glyph which has to be there to make sense. And it perfectly does – 15 days of difference between the day signs themselves and also dates that are 15 days apart. The Maya were careful and exact astronomers and calculators. What we have in front of us with the Codex Dresdensis is so fascinating by itself, that I stand in awe. There is absolutely no need to construct or make up a theory about a sunken city to make it interesting.

Also: Rittstieg’s theory is plain wrong.

I want to thank Mario and Jens of http://www.faszination-maya.de/ for their assistance and the permission to use their pictures. I urge you all to visit their site; you might even want to think about learning German just for that. It’s totally worth it!

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